Action - GNPR 2016-2017: Promotion of healthy diet and prevention of obesity and diet-related NCDs (q12a) 8 Healthy Dietary Guidelines - Food-based dietary guidelines - Adult men and women

Programme: GNPR 2016-2017: Promotion of healthy diet and prevention of obesity and diet-related NCDs (q12a) 8 Healthy Dietary Guidelines

Programme description

These programmes and actions were reported by countries for the 2nd WHO Global Nutrition Policy Review 2016-2017 module on actions related to healthy diets, overweight and diet-related NCDs. More actions and programmes reported can be accessed through the country page.

Programme type

References

WHO (2018) Global Nutrition Policy Review. Country progress in creating enabling policy environments for promoting healthy diets and nutrition http://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/policies/global_nut_policyrevi...

The Global Nutrition Policy Review 2016–2017 is the report of the second comprehensive analysis of nutrition-related policy environment, coordination mechanisms, available capacities and actions being taken in 176 Member States (91%) and one area which responded to the survey carried out between July 2016 and December 2017.

Start date:

January
1993
Target group: 
Adult men and women
Implementation details : 

See https://www.healthhub.sg/live-healthy/111/living_with_health_8_sets_diet..., https://www.hpb.gov.sg/HOPPortal/health-article/2758, https://www.healthhub.sg/live-healthy?category=Food-Nutrition, and https://www.healthhub.sg/live-healthy/15/dietary_guidelines_adults 8 dietary guidelines to guide the adoption of healthier eating habits.Designed by HPB especially for Singaporeans, My Healthy Plate is a friendly, easy-to-understand visual guide for creating balanced and healthy meals. It shows what to eat in the right amounts for each meal, to plan your portions accordingly.Dietary guidelines are crucial in helping people to adopt healthier food consumption habits. In Singapore, the dietary guidelines were first developed in 1990, and revised in 1993. A new set of guidelines was then released in 2003, which reflected a shift from nutrient-based to food-based recommendations. This was in line with the increasing recognition that food provides not only nutrients, but also other non-nutrient compounds (e.g. phytochemicals such as lycopene, isoflavones, lutein) which appear to protect against chronic diseases.

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